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Tuesday, October 23, 2012

What Are We Doing Still On The Mountain Top?


What are we doing still sitting on the mountaintop with our vision of God? We are of no use there. Jesus made each of us a new creation and, yes, we love spending time with God, but we have to work out the salvation Christ has put in us through His Holy Spirit. We must seek out God where He is working and join Him in His work. Times of prayer prepare us for times of working with Him. Mountains prepare us for valleys and should not keep us in the clouds, unwilling to work.

 Paul tells Timothy he must train himself. He says, “Discipline yourself for the purpose of godliness; for bodily discipline is only of little profit, but godliness is profitable for all things, since it holds promise for the present life and also for the life to come” (1 Timothy 4:7b-8, NASB). Even Paul realizes and teaches his students that the Christian must be in the fray of everyday human life. It is not the staying on the mountain that tells your witness for Christ, but how you interact with people and in situations. If you are so keen on staying on the mountain, you must ask yourself, are you trying to stay in the vision you had on the mountain or trying to maintain your relationship with God? If the former, you have lost your connection with God and are putting the vision higher than God, making it an idol in your life. Remember, God is the One who gave you the vision; the vision did not give you God. We must continue to hold our relationship with God more dear than the vision. God wants to have a relationship with you in your everyday life. He wants to present Himself through you to the people you meet. God wants humanity to know Him as you present Him in your person to them, the Holy Spirit in you encountering people and their needs. 

Paul rightly said, “For if we are beside ourselves, it is for God; if we are of sound mind, it is for you.” (2 Corinthians 5:13, NASB). Paul speaks of being in his “right mind” because his and our conviction and compulsion from the Spirit is that we must tell everyone Christ died for them. We cannot hold onto the vision and not walk in the world. We must walk in the world if for no other reason than the great urgency of conviction that Christ died for everyone and they must be told and given the opportunity to believe and receive salvation. This is life in Christ, communing with God and sharing and showing the love of God to the world. Visions bolster us and energize us, but of what use are we if we do not leave the mountain top?